Workshop on Gamification of Intelligent Educational Systems

at the 19th International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education (AIED 2018)

London, UK

Goals

Artificial Intelligence in Education is an interdisciplinary field that integrates researchers with different backgrounds (Computer Science, Engineering, Education, Psychology, instructional design and others) but has one common goal: to use Artificial Intellingence techniques to support new learning experiences where students can work mediated by technology and learn more effectively. The support of robust learning is a complex issue due to many factors (e.g., psychological, technological, personal, instructional, etc.) that affect learning processes and hence, the learning outcome.To tackle this problem, researchers in the field have always been innovative. Through the analysis of different learning settings, researchers have found ways to integrate major advances in Artificial Intelligence, Learning Science, Experimental Psychology, Human-Computer Interaction and other areas to leverage the development of Intelligent Educational Systems. For teachers, an intelligent educational system offers better ways to create/reuse/share content, new methodologies and instruments to deploy effective learning activities and accurate tools to analyze students' progress throughout the learning process. For students, it allows for the presenting the content in an intelligent and adaptive fashion, which enables the restructuring of learning content according to students' needs and stimulates the occurrence of deep and long-term understanding.

However, it is still very common that students become disengaged or bored during the learning process by using intelligent educational systems. On the 1 other hand, there is a growing interest in gamification as well as its applications and implications in the field of Artificial Intelligence in Education since it provides an alternative to engage and motivate students during the process of learning. The term Gamification originated in the digital media industry, however, such a term only gained widespread acceptance after late 2010. Gamification refers to the use of game-based elements such as mechanics, aesthetics, and game thinking in non-game contexts aimed at engaging people, motivating action, enhancing learning, and solving problems [1].

Indeed, gamification has risen to significance in the past six years and shows no sign of slowing growth. The first wave of gamification research has predominantly consisted of (1) definitions, frameworks and taxonomies for gamification and game design elements; (2) technical papers describing systems, designs, and architectures; and (3) effect and user studies of gamified systems [2]. Such phenomenon also ocoured in the context of education. Few studies presented empirical solutions and even fewer in the context of artificial intelligence in education [3]. If the first wave was held together by fundamental questions of "what?" and "why?", the current wave is asking difierentiated questions around "how?", "when?", and "how and when not?" The goal of the Workshop is to provide participants the opportunity of: i) present and discuss the empirical studies of gamification in Intelligent Educational Systems; ii) discuss and promote innovative initiatives in educational settings with the use of gamification; and iii) motivate and solidify the research on gamification of intelligent educational systems in order to leverage the development of such systems.


The goal of the Workshop is to provide participants the opportunity of:

  • Present and discuss the empirical studies of gamification in Intelligent Educational Systems;
  • Discuss and promote innovative initiatives in educational settings with the use of gamication;
  • Motivate and solidify the research on gamification of intelligent educational systems in order to leverage the development of such systems.

Audience

It is expected to have around 50 to 100 participants in the Workshop interested on transforming gamificaftion research into social, economical, scientifical impact.
We are particularly interested in scientifical and technological advances in the combination of gamification and intellinget educational systems. It is on the scope of this workshop studies about gamifying intelligent educational systems ando also transforming gamified systems into intelligent ones. The topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

Call for Papers

This workshop will discuss current empirical and new perspectives in scientific and technological advances in the combination of gamification and intelligent educational systems with the aim to promote innovative initiatives in educational settings with the use of gamification. This full-day workshop will discuss key issues on how to use Artificial Intelligence techniques to support new learning experiences and studies about gamification of intelligent educational systems. This includes strategies to gamify intelligent educational systems, techniques to transform gamified systems into intelligent ones, empirical results of the application of intelligent educational systems in gamification, methods and algorithms and research challenges for both teachers and students. See the complete call for papers on Easy Chair.

Important Dates

  • Abstract Submission Deadline: April 2, 2018
    • Abstract should be 800-1000 word
  • Abstract Acceptance Notification: April 11, 2018
  • Paper Submission Deadline: April 23, 2018.
    • Papers should be 6‐10 pages in the LNCS format required by the AIED 2018 Conference.
  • Paper Acceptance Notification: April 30, 2018
  • Camera‐Ready Paper Submission Deadline: May 4, 2018

Submission Guidelines

The extended abstract should contain 3 pages, including abstract and references. The format should be according to Springer guidelines

Submit an 800-1000 word abstract by April 2, 2018 using Easy Chair or email wkspgiles@gmail.com

Program

The Workshop is designed to happen in a half-time day, with the following agenda:

Morning

Paper Session

1. An Ontological Approach to Aid in Gamification Design Process in Education Context
Armando M. Toda, Laíza Ribeiro, Alan Pedro da Silva and Seiji Isotani
Institute of Computer Science and Mathematics, University of São Paulo, BRAZIL

2. Computational Thinking via Game Authoring
Avery Harrison, Taylyn Hulse, Daniel Manzo, Matthew Micciolo, Erin Ottmar and Ivon Arroyo
Worcester Polytechnic Institute, USA

3. Playing and Creating Embodied Math Games
Matthew Micciollo, Avery Harrison, Taylyn Hulse, Erin Ottmar and Ivon Arroyo
Worcester Polytechnic Institute, USA

4. Serious Educational Games as Assessments – What are the hurdles to scoring them fairly?
Clare Walsh, Christian Bokhove and Su White.
University of Southampton - UK

Panel Session

Prof. Huang - Beijing National University, China
Ig Ibbert Bittencourt - Federal University of Alagoas, BR
Seiji Isotani - University of São Paulo, BR
Vanissa Wanick - University of Southampton, UK

Expected Outcomes

During the Workshop we intend to provide thought-provoking discussions about the quality of research on gamification and intelligent educational systems. With the workshop, we expect i) to build a community of researchers and practitioners around the best practices for the implementation of gamification in intelligent systems in education; ii) to understand game elements and/or game design thinking behind gamified strategies for intelligent educational systems; iii) to inform about the future of gamification and intelligent systems; and iv) new propositions about how to integrate scientific impact into social and economical development through the research gamification of intelligent educational systems. After the workshop, it is also expected to propose a special issue to AIED Journal.

Organizers

Ig Ibbert Bittencort

Ashok Ranchhod

University of Southampton, UK
Ig Ibbert Bittencort

Ig Ibbert Bittencourt

Federal University of Alagoas, Brazil
Ig Ibbert Bittencort

Seiji Isotani

University of São Paulo, Brazil
Ig Ibbert Bittencort

Vanissa Wanick

University of Southampton, UK

Program Committee

To be confirmed.

References

  1. Sebastian Deterding et al. "From game design elements to gamefulness: defining "gamification"". In: Proceedings of the 15th International Academic MindTrek Conference: Envisioning Future Media Environments, MindTrek 2011, Tampere, Finland, September 28-30, 2011. 2011, pp. 9-15. doi: 10.1145/2181037.2181040.
  2. Lennart E. Nacke and Sebastian Deterding. "The maturing of gamification research". In: Computers in Human Behavior 71 (2017), pp. 450-454. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2016.11.062.
  3. Simone de Sousa Borges et al. "A systematic mapping on gamification applied to education". In: Symposium on Applied Computing, SAC 2014, Gyeongju, Republic of Korea - March 24 - 28, 2014. 2014, pp. 216-222. doi: 10.1145/2554850.2554956.